A DVT can occur at any time during your pregnancy, and although not common, pregnancy and postpartum are risk factors for thrombosis with events occurring in approximately 1–2 in every 1000 women.

Risk factors that may increase VTE risk in pregnancy and postpartum include:

  • Being over 35 years of age
  • Have already had three or more babies
  • History of previous venous thrombosis
  • Family history of a mother, father, brother or sister who has had a venous thrombosis
  • Existing diagnosis of a thrombophilia
  • Have a medical condition such as heart disease, lung disease or arthritis
  • Overweight with a BMI over 30
  • A smoker or if you use intravenous drugs
  • During pregnancy
  • If you are admitted to hospital
  • Multiple pregnancy
  • Become dehydrated or less mobile in pregnancy due to, for example, vomiting in early pregnancy
  • Are immobile for long periods of time
  • Have pre-eclampsia

RCOG clinical guideline: Reducing the Risk of Thrombosis and Embolism during Pregnancy and the Puerperium.

 





Where do we go with RCOG guidelines

Dr Alyshah Abdul Sultan

Updates on pregnancy associated aHus from national centres

Prof David Kavanagh

Pregnancy-associated Venous Thromboembolism, A Word from Down-Under

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Lupus & vasculitis as a cause of TMA in pregnancy

Prof Liz Lightstone

Atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome in pregnancy

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Diagnosis and managing of pregnancy related TMA (HELLP/PET)

Dr Lucy Mackillip

The Antiphospholipid Syndrome: TMAs & pregnancy

Dr Karen Breen

Thrombotic microangiopathies & pregnancy

Prof Beverley Hunt

TTP diagnosis & management in pregnancy

Prof Marie Scully

Thromboprophylaxis in pregnancy, the Cardiff Experience

Dr Rachel Rayment

Management of PTS after pregnancy acquired VTE

Mr Stephen Black

DiPEP: Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism (PE) in Pregnancy

Dr Steve Goodacre